Coral Project Dahab 2017

Dates

CPD2017-I: 6. May - 10. June 2017

Maybe Coral Spawning at this date.

CPD2017-II: 4. November - 9. December 2017

2-weeks participating possible as well.

(Date = arrival date, training starts usually one day later)

 

Project prerequisites
PADI Advanced Open Water Diver (or similar) with at least 25 dives, students of marine science or related field are desireable but not restricted to. Knowledge of marine biology is an advantage. We offer Open Water Diver courses and training dives for uncertified divers. You need to arrive at least 12 days before project start.

NEW - project volunteering with just snorkelling skills

 

Participants
Maximum number of participants for the project is 12.

 

Costs
5 weeks packages includes: accommodation, 40 project dives, training, airport shuttles and 1 boat trip 960*,- € per Person (Snorkeler: 570 €)

2 weeks packages includes: accommodation, 20 dives, training, airport shuttles and 1 boat trip 730*,- € per Person (Snorkeler: 440 €)

*Price is excluding diving equipment! You can rent full dive equipment (except dive computer) for 5,50 € per dive.

Project description
You will learn to collect data underwater using different survey techniques, analyse and interpret the data. The project will run for four weeks, during which presentations, training, fieldwork in the following topics will deal with:

  • Coral bleaching (monitoring, coral watch, survey techniques)
  • Coral diseases (id techniques, built up a local catalogue)
  • Coral diversity (scleractinian coral groups, id techniques)
  • Coral damages (anthropogenic threats, natural coral feeders and damage)

Application procedure
Please send a short e-mail with CV to chrisvonmach(at)redsea-ec.org. We will send you confirmation and invoice as soon as possible.

 

DRM

Acropora

Team DRM2010

Acropora

Team DRM2010

 

  DRM2010   DRM2010
 
 

Coral Project Dahab 2014-II - Project report

We arrived in Dahab and loved it! The dive centre is right in the centre of town next to lots of restaurants with lovely views of the sea. The weather is gorgeous! Possibly too hot to start with and now comfortably warm and sunny. Everyone is so friendly and helpful in Dahab generally, but especially at Sinai Divers and at RSEC.

We started the Dahab coral project with training about everything we can encounter during a survey, for example: coral- damage, diseases, bleaching. Learning the substrates and coral types was essential because during the surveys you have to know which coral is victim of a disease or damage. There was a lot to learn about identifying corals and how they are affected by state of health and so the test was difficult. This test ensures the data we collect is scientifically valid. Passing the test meant we were ready to start the calibration dives. This is a practice survey to perfect our positioning, writing on slates, and to check we would collect the same data.

Now we were ready for the real surveys! Our first survey took place in Moray garden- a dive site just outside Dahab. Doing the first survey was a lot of fun. We discovered that it is hard to conserve air whilst doing a survey because you are concentrating so much on collecting the data. During the surveys we have two teams. Team 1: damage & predation and team 2: bleaching and diseases. For the bleaching and disease team a camera is essential. Taking pictures of the diseases ensures we can determine the disease. During the surveys another person records the substrate with a video camera, so we can analyze the footage in the office later in the day. It was a lot of fun to play with toy torpedoes during the safety stop. The boat trip was even more fun, but unfortunately the current was too strong to carry out the survey work, so we did two leisure dives instead. The lunch on the boat was delicious and the view of the mountains was beautiful.

Each of the snorkeling transects are very shallow -less than 1 m deep. This means the wave action makes it difficult to hold the camera steady enough to record a film, so unlike the divers we don’t record footage of the substrate we write it on a slate. In addition to recording substrate for each transect survey Nadja’s master thesis requires her to record coral damage such as breakage and abrasion. When circumstances allow, we also record disease, predation and bleaching of the corals during a survey, but this isn’t always possible.

CPD2014-II

 

CPD2014-II

CPD2014-II

CPD2014-II

CPD2014-II

 
 

Coral Project Dahab 2014-I Project report

Our small group with Nina as our adviser, Silal and Aylin as volunteers felt comfortable in Dahab right after a few days. On Friday we started with a presentation about coral reefs and different precautions of the eastern Sinai Peninsula. Due to the political situation we had to start the project with just three people and modified the primary course of the Coral Project. We film the substrate in different depth and afterwards we analyse the videos by arranging the substrate into life form categories. Additional, Aylin does a fish census in every transect to use these data for her master's thesis. The first four dives we had were to orientate, for learning of the different coral growth forms and to exercise the procedure underwater. One dive in Mashraba we utilized to free the corals of empty rice bags, which were washed into the Masbat bay a few weeks ago due to a siltation flood. Filming, fish census and the teamwork worked very well, so we could start very fast with the official survey dives. Nina did a presentation about growth forms of corals and coral diseases to observe them in our dives. In the first week we already did a few transects in Masbat bay and outside in Abu Helal and Islands and also analysed the first videos. The silt flood which took place in Masbat bay because of heavy rain in the desert caused a siltation in a big area of the bay. The covering of the corals results in bad photosynthesis efficiency and we are interested in how the coral will manage this high stress factor. Therefore, we had transects in this area, where we measured the silt-height and also took the fish census, thus it was very low. Unfortunately this event recurred in the first week, and now the transects in Mashraba have to wait for lighter days to be observed.

 

 

CPD2014-I

CPD2014-I

CPD2014-I

 
 

Coral Project Dahab 2013-II, 4. weekly report:

In the 4th week we were able to complete our surveys at the Lighthouse and Mashraba. High current made impossible to film the lower depths. Furthermore, we did survey dives in the Coral Garden, Garden Muray and Abu Helal. At Light House we saw a turtle in the early morning hours at breakfast of soft corals. The week we also put up a really beautiful boat trip in the south of Dahab, where we enjoyed in addition to 2 great dives and the cozy atmosphere on deck. Also we made an impressive trip to the Blue Hole and The Bells, where we enjoyed the huge drop-off into the deep blue and had fun to "Jump" at the Bells.

Particularly impressive were the night dives where the dive sites on the reef showed a completely different picture: A sleeping turtle, feather stars and as a team lionfish and moray eels in the hunt. But not only with ordinary light we could watch the action at night, also an extraordinarily beautiful fluorescent dive gave us unforgettable memories, whether the greenish glowing bright corals or reddish fish. We will analyze the rest of the videos on Saturday and hope to have first results of the evaluation. Unfortunately, the project is already coming to an end and we gradually must say goodbye from the team with whom we spent a wonderful time the last weeks.

 

 

CPD2013-II

 

CPD2013-II

CPD2013-II

CPD2013-II

CPD2013-II

 
 

Coral Project Dahab 2013-II, 3. weekly report:

This week we continued surveying Islands, Mashraba and Lighthouse dive sites which all have beautiful coral gardens. A group of us, including some instructors from the dive center, took a trip to Tiran; a dive location just off Sharm-El-Sheikh. All three dives were fantastic, pristine corals, shoals of tuna and trevally, napoleon fish, an eagle ray and a 4m manta ray which topped off the whole trip. Two more volunteers arrived so we have had productive office hours analyzing video footage whilst Nina teaches them substrate identification so next week they can join the surveys. During our days off Patrick completed the PADI advanced open water course and Natalie completed the PADI enriched air specialty.

 

CPD2013-II

 

CPD2013-II

CPD2013-II

CPD2013-II

 
 

Coral Project Dahab 2013-II, 2. weekly report:

After perfecting the identification of substrate types and coral disease/predation in the first week, we completed two practice dives along a transect using video equipment and slates. Our knowledge on coral types and disease was assessed in a photo exam in the office as well as a practical assessment underwater. During survey dives, slates are used to collect data on coral disease, predation, breakage and bleaching. Video footage of the 20m transect is then analyzed back at the office and databases are filled out accordingly. Later in the week we conducted surveys at dive sites outside of Dahab which differed in topography and inhabitants from dive sites in the bay. We also took part in a night dive at the dive location ‘Lighthouse’ and saw basket stars, cuttlefish, squid, a sleeping turtle, a baby octopus and various soft corals. On our day off some of us visited the white canyon and coloured canyon in the mountains which was spectacular. All in all a fantastic second week!

 

CPD2013-II

 

CPD2013-II

CPD2013-II

CPD2013-II

 
 

Coral Project Dahab 2013-II, 1. weekly report:

This week we have been learning about the different substrate types and coral diseases in preparation for starting the surveys. This has included working in the classroom and also practicing coral species and disease identification underwater. In order to complete the surveys without damaging any of the corals, we have been practicing neutral buoyancy and completing underwater obstacles in the buoyancy park.

Mid-week we carried out a cleanup dive at Mashraba to reduce the amount of trash in the water which is very damaging to the reef ecosystem. The consequences of rubbish on the corals can unfortunately be seen in many of the dive sites around Dahab so this was an important dive for the RSEC volunteers to take part in.

Already in the first week we have seen a lot of interesting fish species; these include ghost pipefish, seahorses, scorpionfish, bluespotted stingrays and various moray eels. Learning so much about the coral reef and how to recognize signs of damage has increased our awareness of coral health and how important it is to protect and preserve these vital ecosystems.

 

CPD2013-II

 

CPD2013-II

CPD2013-II

CPD2013-II

 
 

Coral Project Dahab 2013-I, Report 2. Week:

At the beginning of the second week we were all busy studying the different types of substrates and diseases of corals. As a reward we had our first dive outside of the Masbat Bay, at Moray Garden. This is where we practiced our skills that we need to carry out the surveys. On one of the dives we saw a Crown of Thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci), a prime example for predation, since it is able to devour several entire coral colonies in a matter of days. It was a fun day, with tasty lunch, and chilling out on the idyllic beach during the breaks in between dives. The practice surveys were a success, as everyone in the group was motivated.
The week rounded off nicely as we celebrated Tali’s birthday, relaxing in the RSEC house’s garden, and for which the rest of the volunteers baked a lovely chocolate cake.

 

CPD2013-I

 

CPD2013-I

CPD2013-I

CPD2013-I

CPD2013-I

 
 

Coral Project Dahab 2013-I, Report 1. Week:
Soon after all the Coral Project I volunteers arrived safely in Dahab, we began with an introductory lecture on Thursday, giving us an insight as to what lies ahead for the next five weeks. In the afternoon we finally got into the water for check dive.
For the next couple of days we dove in the buoyancy park to practice our buoyancy and underwater skills. This is as we need to have perfect buoyancy for when we do our survey dives to make sure we are able without harming the corals and other underwater life.
After having learnt the different coral species, their growth patterns and the different substrate types from the presentation we were able to use our newly acquired knowledge in the field and off we went underwater for indicator practice dives. We then went on a night dive as a treat for all the learning we have been doing. We then attended further presentations about the different threats to the local corals; coral diseases, predation and breakage.
We have also practiced filming along a transect line as we will be using this method when we start collecting data for the surveys.
But of course after having learned so many new things we are all keen to enjoy our free time in beautiful Dahab. From having a delicious BBQ in the RSEC house to a boat trip and yoga and experiencing the night life, it’s safe to say we are all having a super great time!

DRM2013 Team

 

CPD2013-I

CPD2013-I

CPD2013-I

 
 

Coral Project Dahab 2012-II fifth (and last) week

On Thursday and Friday, we had on each day again two dives at lighthouse, which were really fun! But nothing was as good as the fluorescent night-dive on Saturday, for which we used special masks and bluelight torches and which gave us the impression of having Christmas under water! The next day we were doing two dives again, one clean-up and one survey dive. On Tuesday evening we gave a presentation about our project for the university group that is here doing a field course. On Wednesday we dived for the last time but this time at Islands, which is very nice because of the huuuuge pinnacles of Porites, almost as big as a house ;) In the evening of the same day we went to the desert for one of the famous Bedouin dinners. We were all sitting around the fire and enjoyed the delicious food. Unfortunately it was time for the farewell but we all hope to come back soon!

  Coral Project
 
 

Coral Project Dahab 2012-II fourth week

In the fourth week we started to evaluate our data. Therefore we designed some graphs from the results to compare the data from the different dive sites. We are doing the final evaluation next week, so you still have to wait for the results. Furthermore we made a presentation for the recently arrived student group from Germany to tell them all about our volunteer activities. The presentation will be given this evening…     
Between the office work times there was a lot to do under water as well: we started with the surveys at Lighthouse and picked up the rubbish between Lighthouse and Mashraba. Because of aesthetic reasons we will not go in details of what we found! Meanwhile collecting the data underwater proceeds quickly and it’s fun to experience our own progresses underwater too!   

 

 

 

Coral Project

Coral Project

 
 

Coral Project Dahab 2012-II third week

Three weeks are already passed and you feel it. We make the way to the dive center without being hunted by goats and underwater there are almost no crashes. Even the survey work is better, everybody knows what to do and we have a certain routine. We all manage to swim in a head-down position while writing down the data. Because diving here is so fascinating, even on our days off we are all diving. We already saw another turtle, eagle rays and sting rays. So now on our to-see list there are only left sharks, whale sharks, dolphins and sea horses. This week we finally had the boat trip. We were all pretty sure that we were going to see something spectacular, but like always we had bad luck. Nevertheless it was still a beautiful day and 3 fantastic dives. After work we have enough time to visit different places in Dahab. That’s why we all spend an unforgettable night in the desert, watching the meteor rain. There are just a few survey sites left, so that we are all looking forward to use the last dives as fun dives.

 

 

 

 

 

Coral Project

Coral Project

 
 

Coral Project Dahab 2012-II second week

In the second week Nina showed us the Survey Methods. So that the following dives were a bit complicated, but today everybody manages to swim backwards and in a head down position. And the whole credit for this goes to Abby, who trained us very patiently in the Buoyancy park, even if we failed the triangle for the 100th time. We had the most fun with the underwater camera, which everyone was allowed to play around with, so that we took a lot of funny photos. Now we need the camera for the video transect and only one has the honor of  filming. Actually nobody really knows how to hover in the same distance above the transect line and swim slow enough, so that we can analyse the video. But we get better every day. In this week we have way more work to do than in the first, we have to plan the dives, put in the data, analyse the videos and complete the disease catalogue. Because we have loads of work our days start early and end later. But we are already improving and working more efficiently. But we all don´t care as long as we have these breathtaking dives every day. Like today we saw our first turtle!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coral Project

Coral Project

 
 

Coral Project Dahab 2012-II first week

The first week passed very fast. The first days Nina showed us everything and explained a lot, besides everbody got their dive equipment. We really had to get used to the 3D-Element water, so at the beginning there were a lot of collisions between the buddies. That’s why the first thing that we learned was to pay more attention at our buddy. Nina shared every day a bit of her knowledge with us, so that we all had the feeling to never ever be able to separate all the corals and diseases. So we had to prove our new learned knowledge about all the corals underwater and in two tests. After the work we tried a lot of Dahab’s Restaurants, but after a week we already have been daily guests at the restaurant next to the dive center. The team of the Sinai Divers Backpackers is really nice and always helping, even in Ramadan they carry our tanks. And whenever you are bored just have a talk with them.

 

 

 

Coral Project

Coral Project

 
 

Coral Project Dahab 2012 - First report

Now, we’re here for two weeks already – time is running so fast =). In the first weeks, we had the opportunity to get acquainted with Dahab above and below the water surface. Nina, the supervisor of the project, has already introduced us into the world of corals, the damages and their diseases.  In a final test we could demonstrate our newly acquired knowledge – and, fortunately, we all passed the test. Some days ago, we could also welcome a new diver (PADI-OWD) and biology student in the diving community. So, we are now able to start our project with a team of four divers and one volunteer working mainly in the office. During the dives, we had already the opportunity to get familiar with Coral Damage and Disease-Analysis. The underwater world here is impressive. Many fishes, beautiful corals and other lower animals (invertebrates) as well as the seasonal related limited number of divers and tourists makes the diving here to an extraordinary experience. Unfortunately, we observed a lot of damage caused by inexperienced snorkelers and chaotic or careless divers. With special survey-techniques and methods, we will check and record the momentary situation of the coral reefs in the next weeks. Furthermore, a highlight will be the analysis of the Reef by high-tech fluorescence during night dives together with Prof. Grunz which will possibly allow the fast determination of the health status of reefs in addition to the Damage/Disease survey during daytime in the future. Conclusion: the theory part is finished – let’s start diving!

 

 

 

Coral Project

Coral Project

Coral Project

  Coral Project Coral Project   Fluoreszenz
 
 

Coral Project Dahab 14.7.-11.8.2011 – Bulletin 2

The good thing about the wind in Egypt is the fact, that it´s easier to stand the heat. You can breathe normally again, sleep the whole night and you´re not sweating like hell when you´re in the sun.
The bad thing about the Wind in Dahab is the fact that we are not able to work properly.
When we, motivated as we are, trying to get into the water in the morning, the waves are just trying to keep us, with all their force out.
At a normal survey dive, you try to have a good buoyancy to come as close as possible to the corals. Due to the weather conditions we have now, we are happy when we don´t get seasick on 5m and find the corals where we stopped for writing at 13m. However, now we just try to do what´s possible, that means doing the survey at 15m. Today we also started with an UW cleanup  in the bay, cause that’s maybe the best thing we can do at the moment. Nina is checking the “Windguru” every day, but her face also gets unhappy every day, as it says wind for the rest of the week. So we all just hope that Egyptian weather forecasts as bad as European ones, so we can start with the surveys again. So just at the moment we a polishing every fish in the bay until we are able to see our self in his scales-

Your´s, some cleaning volunteers from the border of the red sea ;)

 

 

 

Coral Project Dahab

Black Band Disease

White Pox Disease

 
 

Coral Project Dahab 14.7.-11.8.2011 – Week 1

Hi everybody at home. I hope you enjoy your time sitting in front of your PC, starring at the cloudy, cold weather outside. Actually we have about 40 degrees and sunshine every day, which is also hard to handle when you´re used to middle European weather conditions. It´s now two weeks, since we started the Coral Project 2011. We are a mixed group of six Volunteers from Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Greece. We used the first days in Dahab practice our buoyancy, so we can dive the “scientist style”. That means you´re hanging around, most of the time head down, on a strap that’s 20m long and is placed on a coral reef, trying to get data, while not destroying every coral around you. That worked quite well after three days, so we went on to get information about the corals (Coral Bleaching, diseases and Coral ID). Well, we didn´t do that the whole day as we also went diving to practice under water what seemed quite difficult theoretically. However, under water it´s a lot easier to find out which disease the coral has. So, after we did a test to see if we are ready for a real survey, we started collecting the data.
It´s quite interesting to learn about how a coral reef works, which animals are depending on it and which impact mankind has on this ecosystem.

So that’s it for now, we´ll try to update you now more often about what we are doing here.
Best wishes from Dahab ;)

Markus Dengg

 

Coral Project Dahab 2011

Coral Project Dahab 2011

  Coral Project Dahab 2011   Coral Project Dahab 2011
 
 

Coral Project Quseir 2010 – Week 1
On the 3rd of September, everything was finally ready to roll. For about two weeks Quseir Field station had become busier and busier by the day, with a steady dribble of volunteers arriving in small groups or one by one. It was by no means a boring time and everybody used it to get accustomed to the gear, the dive location (Utopia Bay), the fishes, corals, all the other critters and obviously, the social side of things. Highlights included Niels’ Farewell Party on our spacious rooftop, where our Egyptian friends constituted the majority of guests, snorkelling with Dolphins at the Radisson Jetty and the boat trip to Sharm el Fugani on Simone’s Birthday. Also we used the time to assist Stephi, who is doing a sea urchin census at the Radisson Reef crest for her B.Sc. Thesis and Romana, who is studying bleaching and coral diseases and the temporal dynamics thereof.

With the arrival of Kim on the 2nd of September the group of 13 volunteers was complete and the theoretical training could begin. Pascal was assisted by Nina, who had come from Dahab to assist in the initial planning of the project, and Hendrik, our dive master. The first day was filled with presentations about coral reefs and how to IC corals, while the next morning the topic shifted towards coral diseases. Methodology was introduced; especially the LIT Survey (English et al 1997) and hand signals for communication under water were practiced both dry and wet in some test dives. Gear was piled up in the living room, checked and packed again and again, so everybody knows where everything belongs. After three days that were divided between theory, dry practice and test dives, a first practice dive, using the complete methodology was conducted – and attracted an unlikely visitor. A curious Dolphin was quite successful in distracting most of the team – only two people kept rolling out the transect lines, resisting all efforts of their colleagues to direct their attention to the special guest. In the following days the methods were refined slightly and more practice dives were scheduled. An interesting and challenging addition to our repertoire is a tetra pod for taking 1m² photo plots with a fixed distance to the camera. With about 1,7m height the towing of this construction and its handling underwater requires some good buoyancy skills. The end of the week – and Ramadan – was celebrated properly with a trip to Abu Dabab on Thursday Evening and we look forward to applying our newly won knowledge to do the first real surveys starting Saturday.

Text: Daniel & Sven

Pictures: Daniel

 

Coral Project

Coral Project

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Coral Project Quseir 2010 – Week 2 & 3

After a week of training in the office, underwater and changing the methods we were finally able to collect data. Sometimes the methods and the organisation of the dives had to be adapted to strong currents and tides, coupled with unusually “cold” weather. We even had rain for a couple of minutes. But all in all everyone became more and more familiar with working underwater and the project could proceed. We even had time to do some underwater clean ups in Utopia Bay.
End of last week a 2 day trip to Wadi El Gemal National Park was planned and fully enjoyed by everyone. A 3 hour walking tour through the desert of the National Park made the early waking up at 3:30 worth it. After the hot experience, a Mangrove Lagoon was the perfect refreshment though the stinging upside-down-jellyfish weren´t enjoyed by everyone!! For lunchtime we enjoyed a friendly welcome in a Bedouin village where we were spoiled with spicy coffee, sand-baked bread and experienced some Bedouin traditions. We spent the night at a nice laid-back camp, where we also had a fun-dive the next day.
Starting to work with new enthusiasm the next week, we now started to complete the gaps in our data and are already looking forward to the analysis.

Text: Alice + Romana
Photos: Alice + Daniel

 

Coral Project

Coral Project

 
 

Coral Project Quseir 2010 – Week 4

Finally the last week of the project has arrived. That means that we had to collect the last bits of the missing data to complete our study:quantifying coral damages and diseases, collecting data on reef zonation, re-locating and collecting the settlement plates that were laid out with an incubation time of s...ix weeks and again photographing all the tagged diseased corals. To have a supposedly pristine reef to compare our data to, we chose - as a comparison site - a dive site called Zerib Kebir (10 km north of Utopia Bay) where we also studied substrate, and collected data on damaged and diseased corals.

The analysis of the settlement plates was exciting. After cleaning the plates with a detergent, we found 20 small coral recruits on 20 plates. Identifying the polyps with a programme called Coral ID was thrilling and we could identify which coral species where the pioneer settlers for each of the sites studied.

On Wednesday noon, as a farewell evening, we went to Ghost City, an abandoned Bedouin village where we had a really nice bonfire dinner and slept on thin carpets. Luckily no scorpions were around which was proved by some plucky volunteer adventurers which were desperately in search for them.

FINAL REPORT:

Now that the Coral Project is over we will have a look back and see what we have done.
First of all we had to lay out the Line Intercept Transects to be able to create a topographic and ecological map of the Utopia Bay. This was developed by laying a measurement tape from 0 down to 20 meters over a maximum length of 100 meters and by identifying the substrate lying below the tape.
The most intense task was to look for coral damages and diseases in the 6 belt transects we marked in the Utopia Bay – 2 inside, 2 outside North and 2 outside South. These were 5 meters wide and went from 20 meters depth up to the surface following the reef slope.
The last task was to analyze the surface of the settlement plates in search of small coral recruits.

The project itself was a challenge for everyone as it was the first time a survey to this extent has been conducted around El Quseir and we had only one supervisor for most of the time.
After some starting problems because of difficult weather conditions and a few absences due to illness we finally got into the routine to coping with our daily tasks. Some organizational matters were distributed to the volunteers including preparing the equipment and planning the upcoming dives and thus everybody had some responsibilities and the project could run smoothly.

All in all, we had a very fascinating and interesting time and we surely take along home a lot of knowledge about corals and the vulnerability of their habitat.

In these days everyone is leaving one by one and the farewells are getting harder and harder. Now the mixed bunch of biologists and non-biologists from all over Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Slovakia which came together for one big mission disperse back to their homes...

 

Coral Project

Coral Project

Coral Project

Coral Project

Coral Project

 
 

Short outline of the Coral Projects:

Coral Diversity and Distribution Project
Different sites of the reef provide diverse environmental factors and require different adaptations of coral species (Loya 1972). One goal is to characterise chosen reefs and provide an overview of coral species, their abundance, density and distribution in different zones at the fringing reefs in the region of El Quseir. This project focuses on the species, the morphology and the size (and age) of coral colonies and tries to correlate these characteristics with their locations. Furthermore, the density of species in different locations is of major interest.

Monitoring of Abundance and Coral Health:
Monitoring of the corals concerning their abundance in various zones, bleaching and disease or other damage and algal overgrowth is a long term activity, which will provide information on possible seasonal changes in the reef or changes due to other (climatic or anthropogenic) impacts.

Coral Sexual Reproduction Project:
Study on the sexual reproduction biology of the corals will be conducted. A study recording the spawning events is planed, as up to now these data is rare for the Red Sea (Shlesinger et al. 1998, Hanafy et al. 2010).
Precisely synchronized spawning allows the stationary animals to mix genetically and to disperse offspring over great distances. It is important that synchronic spawning events are recorded and a schedule for these events is developed in order to facilitate effective management. In particular, human disturbances should be prohibited during spawning seasons, ensuring that the seasonal reproduction and reef replenishment is not disturbed.

Coral Recruitment Project:
Recruitment is the measure of the number of young individuals entering the adult population and it is an essential factor in cases of damage or decrease of the reef due to climatic or anthropogenic disturbances. The study of the natural rates of coral recruitment helps to better understand the potential of repopulation in the reef. Documentation of recruitment in the reef is important for estimating the recovery rate of a reef (Hughes et al. 1999, Loch et al. 2004).
Long term study will be conducted in order to collect data on the recruitment patterns in the Red Sea throughout the year. Quantitative analysis and species specific analysis of young coral recruits are possible here (Babock et al. 2003).

Defined environmental abiotic parameters will be seasonally recorded accompanying the data of the above sketched studies to allow a correlation of such abiotic data sets with the observed results.

Collected data is valuable in terms of biological interest. Furthermore, the collected data will provide a foundation for the design of protective and recovery measures that will enable reef preservations for appropriate and long-term future use.

 

 

Acropora

Acropora

Fluor

Acropora

Acropora